Africa Proverb

Due to its double Identity, the Bat was never burried-

Power and Influence

Dr Chiku Malunga

Dr Chiku Malunga is a Malawian writer and organisational development consultant.
He has worked as a consultant for over 100 organisations in over 26 countries in Africa and the rest of the world.

His main focus is in developing organisational growth and development through African indigenous developed methods and practices developed through the common experience of life.

Dr Chiku Malunga has written over 12 books on the development and management of organisation through African age old and enduring wisdom.

Currently he is resident in Malawi and consulting and writing.

Endogenous Development: Naive Romanticism or Practical Route to Sustainable African Development

Edited by Chiku Malunga, Capacity Development Consultants (CADECO), Blantyre, Malawi and Susan H. Holcombe, Brandeis University, Waltham, MA, USA
Series: Development in Practice Books
Western ideas, worldviews, actors, tools, models, and frameworks have long dominated development theory and practice in Africa. This bookgives a platform for thirteen African voices, academics and practitioners, to turn this development process rooted in African philosophy, traditions and experience, and shaped by African decision-makers. This book was originally published as a special issue of Development in Practice. read more

NGO Management: The Earthscan Companion By Alan Fowler and Chiku Malunga

The task environment of NGOs is changing rapidly and significantly making new demands on their management and leadership. This Companion discusses the complexities involved. It illustrates how NGOs can maintain performance and remain agile amidst increasing uncertainties.

These factors include the position of NGOs in civil society, their involvement in governance and coping with the effects of the securitisation of international aid.
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Oblivion or Utopia: The Prospects for Africa By Chiku Malunga

Oblivion or Utopia: the Prospects for Africa explains that most of the problems on the continent stem from the fact that, although the continent may be politically independent, it is not economically independent. Efforts to reverse the continent's continuing underdevelopment have failed to date, including trillions of dollars in aid, because they have not been consciously aimed at enabling Africa to turn its vast natural resources into wealth, which is the only known way of ensuring economic independence.
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